Copyright and sound archiving, a comment on Suspense

I'd like to bring your attention to some wonderful comments from blog listener James who recalls hearing "Suspense" on Armed Forces Radio and a bit about how the BBC created their own series that was similar to "Suspense".

If you haven't read it yet, I recommend checking out a recent report from the Library of Congress on how copyright and ownership issues are causing difficulties for libraries and archives in preserving audio recordings.  (Boingboing and other blogs have featured posts about the report the past few days.)  Of particular interest is the section on old time radio, where they outline issues with how original recordings are so widespread and dispersed among institutions and private collectors.  They also outline the many copyright and intellectual property issues faced by institutions and collectors when dealing with the material.

You can download the entire pdf document (1 mb) here - the old time radio section starts on page 29.  The report is free for download or $30 for a printed copy.

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  • KLinNYC

    OTR on the Internet is not safe anymore.

    The “music nazis” who have been attacking the music blogs have expanded their territory to include OTR using the justification that many of the scripts were copyrighted.

    I would understand if they bothered the teenagers who are uploading current/recent recordings, because I agree that that is copyright infringement. However, the MNs have recently shut down many vintage music blogs that restored vintage music recordings from 78s.

    The most active groups are based in the UK and Belgium, but the others in North America and elsewhere are catching up.

    I belong to a private blog, and we’ve been able to determine that the blogs that were hit were located through those blog directories, and any public linking to services like FaceBook, etc. They also did not use a blog function in which a blog will not show up in a search through a search engine (I don’t know if podbean gives that option).

    The Google blogs have had it the worst, supposedly because Google plans to launch a music service to compete with iTunes.

    I just thought you’d want to know.

    Oct 24, 2010 at 7:10 pm

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